Dale Corbett, PhD
Professor of Neurosciences,
University of Ottawa and
Scientific Director & CEO of the Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery
   

Getting to know Dr. Corbett...

Q: Best advice anyone has given you?
A: Early on I was advised that the key to having a successful research career was to find an outstanding lab manager or research assistant. I followed that advice and I have been fortunate to have highly motivated and dedicated individuals working with me throughout my career. This has allowed me to focus on other key activities and also ensure consistent, high quality laboratory practice among my trainees.

Q: What is your favorite thing about your career?
A: No question that it is sitting with trainees and discussing their research projects with them. When I eventually retire this is what I will miss the most.

Q: What's your favorite holiday?
A: My wife and I have a place at Silver Star Mountain in the Okanogan region of British Columbia, Canada. This resort has great downhill skiing but is renowned for its world class Nordic ski trails (over 100 km) that are used by both the Canadian and US national teams. My wife and I put on skis just outside our door and enjoy early November skiing as well as the high performance Nordic ski camp.  Pure magic!

Dr. Dale Corbett is a Professor of Neurosciences in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at the University of Ottawa and Scientific Director and CEO of the Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF) Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery (CPSR). Prior to his relocation to the University of Ottawa in September 2010, Dr. Corbett held a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Stroke and Neuroplasticity at Memorial University in St. John's Newfoundland. Dr. Corbett obtained his PhD from Concordia University followed by post-doctoral studies at McGill University. Subsequently, Dr. Corbett was a faculty member at Harvard University and also an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.  His laboratory is well known for pioneering research on the protective effects of prolonged, mild hypothermia that culminated in the use of "therapeutic hypothermia " in the treatment of cardiac arrest and stroke.  His current research concerns recovery of sensory-motor and cognitive function following stroke where he has made translational discoveries regarding the importance of early and intensive rehabilitation. He uses a variety of approaches to enhance neuroplasticity and stroke recovery including novel forms of rehabilitation, exercise and mobilization of endogenous neural precursor and stem cells. Related work focuses on exercise and cognition and the metabolic and vascular consequences of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle.

image widget